TV Tuesday: Horror at 37,000 Feet, plus...?

tvtuesday_horror_newsite2Date: October 18 at 8pm

Location: The Silent Movie Theatre, 611 N. Fairfax Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90036

Link out: Click here

Description: The Cinefamily presents a double bill of scary 1970s tele-films. The second title will be revealed at the theatre. Tickets are $10 for non-members; members get in free. We have never seen HORROR AT 37,000 FEET, but judging from the plot line it must be a hoot. At the very least we are amused by the presence of William Shatner in the cast; the title seems to deliberately echo his classic 1963 episode of THE TWILIGHT ZONE, "Nightmare at 20,000 Feet." Somehow we doubt the made-for-TV movie will be of similar quality.

FROM THE WEBSITE:

Cheryl Ladd as a boarding school disciple of Satan? Bernie Casey as the king of the Gargoyles? William Shatner vs. an evil Druid doorstop?!?! In an era where network television was still the only game in town (no cable, no home video, no VOD, no nuthin’), prime-time programming was home to some truly adventurous, out-there ideas — including made-for-TV horror films of a warped ‘n freaky variety that wouldn’t be revisited for decades to come. Join us for a double feature of spooky, campy and altogether amazing titles from this golden age of TV-movie weirdness, featuring a 16mm presentation of The Horror At 37,000 Feet! Starring a smorgasbord of recognizable faces only a “Love Boat” casting director could love, this silly ’70s movie-of-the-week scarefest involves a demonically-possessed Druid artifact from an English monastery coming to supernatural life aboard a transatlantic airline flight, taking control of one of the passengers, and causing lots of made-for-TV mayhem. Panicked personnel include William Shatner as a besotted former priest, Buddy Ebsen (“The Beverly Hillbillies”) as a boisterous tycoon and Chuck Connors (“The Rifleman”) as the gung-ho pilot! The title of the evening’s secret second film will be announced at the show!
The Horror At 37,000 Feet Dir. David Lowell Rich, 1973, 16mm, 73 min.